Storytelling for all ages

Monday, June 11, 2018
Lance Lofton, from left, Nathanial Lofton, Tristan Patterson and Kyson Dexter listen in rapt attention to master storyteller Bil Lepp talk about being in the fourth grade, when he and his classmates were convinced their teacher was Wonder Woman in disguise, at the McCook City Library Saturday. Lepp, one of the headliners at the Buffalo Commons Storytelling Festival, had kids mesmerized and nearby parents laughing at his performance.
Lorri Sughroue/McCook Gazette

Bill Hoyt and Angus Garey recounted family history at the “Home on the Prairie” open mic homesteader stories at the Museum of the High Plains on Saturday. Garey’s great-great-grandmother kept records of her experiences and called the 1870s “seven years of hell” on the homestead near Medicine Creek, with drought, grasshoppers and numerous casualties. Many homesteaders gave up and left the area, but there was a certain element — “horse thieves, murderers and others who had no use for the law, “ as Garey related, that roamed the prairie freely. Hoyt, a descendant of one of four brothers who came over on the Mayflower, talked about his pioneer relatives in the Culbertson area, calling them “hardcore tough” and a bit stubborn. “You can always tell a Hoyt, but by golly, you can’t tell them much,” he joked. Dale Dueland, the emcee for the event, also shared some of his family history as did others in the audience who attended.
Lorri Sughroue/McCook Gazette
Angus Garey
Lorri Sughroue/McCook Gazette
Bill Hoyt
Lorri Sughroue/McCook Gazette
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