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Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Annual banquet to celebrate achievement

Friday, October 26, 2012

With the completion of the two new, state-of-the art hospice rooms in the new wing at Community Hospital and the Healing Garden defying the drought to bring forth fragrant bouquets and vibrant colors, the hardworking hospice committee has set aside the 15th annual An Evening For Hospice as a celebration of what has been accomplished with the $370,000 raised since An Evening For Hospice began in 1997.

On Sunday, Nov. 18, the Community Hospital Health Foundation will welcome patrons to a social hour, catered sit-down dinner, hospice program and a special lighting ceremony in the Healing Garden in appreciation of the support for the hospice program over the years.

Organizers have an elegant evening planned, with a choice of prime rib or salmon provided by Willow Creek Meats, and a cash bar and hors d'oeuvres from Sehnerts' Bieroc Cafe. Side dishes will be provided by the hospital's dietary staff and desserts will be donated by Marlene Bedore.

The brand new Prairie View meeting room will provide seating for 150, where Anita Hirsch of Oberlin, will provide musical entertainment, accompanied by her daughter, Jennifer Tally. The program will include a video prepared by the Nebraska Hospice and Palliative Care Association, introduced by Cathy Nichols, one of Community Hospital's hospice nurses. The evening's festivities will culminate with the lighting ceremony in the Healing Garden.

According to Terri Shipshock, Community Hospital Health Foundation director, the focus of the evening is to symbolically remember and honor loved ones with holiday lights for the garden. The garden will remain illuminated throughout the holiday season. Memorials and honorariums can be purchased for $10. There is no limit on the number that can be purchased and everyone remembering a loved one is welcome to enjoy the garden throughout the season.

"The Healing Garden has already proven to be a blessing for all of our patients and for their family members," Shipshock said. "It is exactly what we had hoped for. When the lights go on that Sunday night, the display will be breathtaking."

Shipshock also was thrilled to report that funds received through An Evening for Hospice over time contributed $50,000 toward the cost of each of the two hospice suites situated on the south end of the new hospital wing.

Although there won't be an auction this year, there will be a drawing for charitable chance tickets. The tickets, at $25, will be sold throughout the evening. The hospice team, which traditionally puts together an impressive auction package, will instead provide an ornament for everyone memorialized in the lighting ceremony. The ornaments will be part of the holiday display in the Prairie View room.

"It is a different approach this year," Shipshock admitted, "one that we hope will express our deep gratitude for the support this program has received through the years.

"Hospice is an invaluable service, provided by special nurses, allowing dignity, comfort and peace at the final stage of life."

Tickets are $50, with $25 of the price an allowable charitable donation. The social hour begins at 6 p.m., followed by dinner and the program at 7 p.m. Evening attire is holiday dressy, adding to the elegance. Seating is limited, so reservations are required no later than Nov. 12.

The lighting ceremony will conclude the evening.

--Sidebar--

Through the years, funds raised during An Evening For Hospice have provided for up-to-date professional development for hospice caregivers and volunteers, equipment and medication for hospice clients and indigent care for those with little or no resources.

The staff is made up of representatives from the Ministerial Association, doctors, the Hospice nursing staff, and social services. They meet once a week for every patient in Hospice, devoting their attention to the development of the most compassionate care plan possible.

Hospice is a family-centered concept of health care for people dying of an incurable disease. The Hospice concept aims at easing the physical and psychological pain of the patient's illness so the patient can best appreciate his or her remaining days of life. It also provides support for family members who struggle to continue to be caregivers even as their season of mourning approaches.

Diane Sandall RN, director of Community Hospital Home Health and Hospice, says that although technology and pharmacology have changed over the years, the premise of hospice hasn't.

"We are caring for more hospice patients," she said, "as more people become aware of the program."

Awareness of what hospice is and what it can do is critical, Sandall said. "And timing is critical so that patients and family members can receive the fullest possible benefits of the program."

Providing professional development

Through the years, funds raised during An Evening For Hospice have provided for up-to-date professional development for hospice caregivers and volunteers, equipment and medication for hospice clients and indigent care for those with little or no resources.

The staff is made up of representatives from the Ministerial Association, doctors, the Hospice nursing staff, and social services. They meet once a week for every patient in Hospice, devoting their attention to the development of the most compassionate care plan possible.

Hospice is a family-centered concept of health care for people dying of an incurable disease. The Hospice concept aims at easing the physical and psychological pain of the patient's illness so the patient can best appreciate his or her remaining days of life. It also provides support for family members who struggle to continue to be caregivers even as their season of mourning approaches.

Diane Sandall RN, director of Community Hospital Home Health and Hospice, says that although technology and pharmacology have changed over the years, the premise of hospice hasn't.

"We are caring for more hospice patients," she said, "as more people become aware of the program."

Awareness of what hospice is and what it can do is critical, Sandall said. "And timing is critical so that patients and family members can receive the fullest possible benefits of the program."


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