[mccookgazette.com] Light Rain Fog/Mist ~ 38°F  
High: 45°F ~ Low: 37°F
Saturday, Apr. 30, 2016

Unclaimed property

Friday, February 26, 2010

Throughout my term as State Treasurer, returning Unclaimed Property has become a passion of mine. I have made it a goal to actively pursue the owners of these lost and forgotten assets rather than wait for them to come to us. Rarely do states take such a proactive stance on returning these assets, but in Nebraska we have done record-breaking work in returning Unclaimed Property.

Unclaimed Property can take any number of forms: money, stocks, bonds, vendor payments, gift certificates or insurance takings. Essentially, any lost, abandoned, or forgotten asset is referred to as Unclaimed Property.

In less than one term in office, we've returned over 43 million dollars of Unclaimed Property to their rightful owners via 55,000 claims. This is more than any previous State Treasurer. Nebraskans deserve for their money to be returned to them. This is the work of our Unclaimed Property Division.

This year, the average claim has been roughly $800. Within the past year, nearly 32,000 new properties have been added to Nebraska's database. In 2009, my office saw $13 million paid out to its rightful owners, through 22,483 claims. So far in 2010, we have paid out $1,294,964.85 in 1542 claims.

There are still millions of dollars in these lost assets. In fact, the Nebraska State Treasurer's office is currently holding over $80 million, just waiting to be claimed by its rightful owners.

There are over 200,000 Nebraskans with Unclaimed Property; that's nearly 1 in every 8 Nebraskans. This means that if you do not have any Unclaimed Property, someone you know surely does. I would recommend searching your own name, and the names of family members and deceased individuals, and any businesses you may have owned over the years. This can be done online at Treasurer.org.

In poor economic times such as these, Unclaimed Property should not be overlooked. You have absolutely nothing to lose. All the information you need can be found online at treasurer.org.


Fact Check
See inaccurate information in this story?


Respond to this story

Posting a comment requires free registration: